Arizona To Allow Felons To Use MMJ

Arizona Supreme Court ruled on Tuesday that courts and prosecutors will no longer be allowed to prohibit marijuana use as a term of probation to convicted felons who possess medical marijuana cards.  Two specific circumstances raised eyebrows in court, leading to the ultimate decision to allow felons to use marijuana as medicine after their release from jail.

A man convicted of possessing marijuana with intent to sell was told by his probation officer that he would not be allowed to use medical marijuana after his release from prison.  Another woman who plead guilty to DUI charges would not accept the fact that she would not be able to use marijuana even though she possessed a medical marijuana card.  Since the Medical Marijuana Act was passed in 2010 and went into effect in 2011, assistant Pima County public defender, David Euchner said, "The Supreme Court is recognizing what the people decided when they passed the initiative: You can use your medicine."

However, prosecutors are not happy with the ruling.  Attorney Bill Montgomery of Maricopa County wrote an e-mail to The Arizona Republic, saying, "There was no discussion at the time of the election regarding the impact to case resolutions and the ability for parties to negotiate plea agreements."   Attorney Sheila Polk of Yavapai County argued, "My goal — and the goal of the system — is to set convicted felons up to succeed, to find employment and to turn their lives around. Marijuana is not part of that equation."

Despite what these attorney's think, we think allowing convicted felons to use medical marijuana with the supervision of their physicians is not a bad thing.  A person's criminal history should not determine the type of medication they are given for any medical condition.  If a circumstance arises where a felon has tried every alternative to medical marijuana but their health does not get better, felons should not be denied the chance to try an all natural medication.