Connecticut To Remove Criminal Marijuana Charges

Last week, the Connecticut Supreme Court ruled people busted in the state now have the right to get their marijuana convictions erased from their criminal record.  The 7-0 ruling came in the case of former Connecticut resident Nicholas Menditto, who requested that his convictions to be overturned after the Legislature decriminalized possession of small amounts of cannabis back in 2011.

Menditto, 31, would like the state to remove his two convictions for marijuana possession in 2009 and a pending possession case.  Aaron Romano, Menditto's attorney, said that when Menditto was arrested, he was using pot to medicate himself, but declined to elaborate.  According to Romano, Menditto is now an activist for the use of medical marijuana.  

The Supreme Court ruled he could apply to have the two convictions erased.  His pending possession case was declined to be addressed and Menditto may take it to the U.S. Supreme Court.  "The legislature has determined that such violations are to be handled in the same manner as civil infractions, such as parking violations," Justice Carmen Espinosa wrote in the ruling. "The state has failed to suggest any plausible reason why erasure should be denied in such cases."