Pennsylvania Senators Pass MMJ

On Wednesday, Pennsylvania senators approved the state’s proposed medical marijuana act with a vote of 43-7.  The bill that was introduced by Democrat state senator Daylin Leach in November of last year is now en route to the state's House of Representatives.

In order to be passed by the senate, the bill had a few amendments made since its origination last year.  The bill, now known as the "Medical Cannabis Act," is still fighting to be put into effect.  A few amendments have been made to the bill that led the Marijuana Policy Project’s Director of State Policies, Karen O’Keefe, to send an email urging MMJ supporters to voice their concerns about the bill.  “Before tomorrow’s vote, let your senator know you stand with the 85% of Pennsylvanians who support allowing medical marijuana. Let him or her know that you want the legislature to enact a bill that doesn’t leave behind vast numbers of suffering patients, and that allows patients to administer medicine the way that works best for them.”

The bill prohibits the ability to smoke marijuana.  Not only that, but it also bans vaporizing as well because people will be able to hide the fact that they are smoking more easily.  Along with those restrictions, the list of qualifying medical conditions has been cut down, too.  Diseases like HIV/AIDS, Crohn’s disease, Alzheimer’s, rheumatoid arthritis and migraine headaches are not considered conditions that deserve MMJ treatment.

The Republican-controlled House doesn’t want to schedule a vote for the marijuana bill, so it still uncertain whether the bill will go into effect or not.  If the House continues to procrastinate on the bill, it will start all over with the possibility of facing new people in the November elections.