The Government Wants The Guns Of MMJ Users

Several states appear ready to follow federal policy in regards to the Second Amendment and ban legal marijuana users from acquiring or possessing firearms. According to the federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms, there is not one person who uses medical cannabis in any capacity and is eligible for gun ownership. This may not be news to most who are aware that illegal drug use renders their weapons contraband.

According to the ATF (Bureau of Alcohol, tobacco and firearm), because of cannabis' classification as a Schedule I drug, “any person who uses or is addicted to marijuana, regardless of whether his or her State has passed legalization authorizing marijuana use for medicinal purposes, is an unlawful user of or addicted to a controlled substance, and is prohibited by Federal law from possessing firearms or ammunition."

gunweed.jpg

Currently, Hawaii is the only state where law enforcement has a list of both medical-marijuana patients as well as gun owners. Law enforcement on the islands demanded that registered gun owners in Hawaii to surrender their weapons. This may also soon be the case in Ohio, Delaware, and other states experimenting with medical cannabis.

Honolulu police Chief Susan Ballard has sent letters to those that use marijuana and own guns.  “Your medical marijuana use disqualifies you from ownership of firearms and ammunition,” the letter read. “If you currently own or have any firearms, you have 30 days upon receipt of this letter to voluntarily surrender your firearms, permit, and ammunition to the Honolulu Police Department (HPD) or otherwise transfer ownership. A medical doctor’s clearance letter is required for any future firearms applications or return of firearms from HPD evidence.”

This viewpoint coincides with that of Attorney General Jeff Sessions, who just earlier this year mocked a Justice Department intern who dared ask about his administration’s tough policy on cannabis and hands-off approach towards gun ownership. States like Ohio and Delaware seem to be jumping on board. Delaware police Chief William Bryson told the Associated Press, “It would make sure that we are doing everything we can to ensure that prohibited people are not buying firearms in Delaware."